Audio tour

Audio tourTops Down (The Morrismen Murder)

Solo in Inglese

2 Fermate tour

  1. Sommario Auditour
  2. Sommario Auditour

    PLEASE WATCH WHERE YOU'RE GOING and be especially mindful of traffic, obstacles etc! Wherever possible, just stick your mobile device in your pocket or hold it in your hand -  when it vibrates you have 7 secs to put your headphones back on to listen

     TOPS DOWN (THE CHIPPING CAMPDEN MORRISMEN MURDER)

    In May 1772, at 2pm, a market gardener named Richard Dyer was found murdered close to his house, half a mile or so from Chipping Camden. ‘There was a shocking fracture to the back of his head’ from a wooden stake found nearby and his head stretching from his mouth to his ear had been ripped open. A short time before Dyer’s body was discovered, a young girl who  passed a local called William Kelly(or 'Keely') on the road had noticed blood stains on his breeches. Kelly was arrested. He first denied the crime, implicating others, but eventually confessed.

    It was an opportunistic, spur of the moment, unpremeditated assault and robbery for money. Kelly knew Dyer and knew that he was on his way home after having been paid for a job. He ‘overtook Dyer on the road, walked with him some way, and as they passed along, he picked up a stake as it lay in the road and…’

    Kelly ‘was a well-known morris dancer’ and a few mornings earlier – on a Sunday to boot – he had been teaching some new dances to the local side along with his friend, Warner, who played pipe and tabor. The local newspapers took a strong line, saying, ‘It is to be hoped that Justices will suppress such nuisances of idleness and drunkenness as morris dances have generally proved’.

    On Friday, 28 September, 1772, Kelly was taken out of his cell in Gloucester and put into a cart for the 30 mile procession to the top of Campden Hill. They arrived at about 3pm, and found ‘many thousands’ waiting for the show to begin. Kelly now openly confessed his guilt, tried to make his peace with God, exhorted everyone there to pray for him and to take warning by his demise – it was all caused by his ‘neglect of the sabbath’, he said, and he ‘wished it had been otherwise’.

    The executioner then put a little straw in his hand, and one of the officials told him to drop the straw when he was ready. Keeley asked the official if he thought God Almighty was ready for him. Soon after, he gave the signal.

     After he was dead, Keeley’s body was hung in chains on a thirty-foot high gibbet, to act as a dreadful reminder of the awful penalty for committing murder and, perhaps, to warn the locals of the perils of taking up Morris dancing.

    Source: Oxford Journal, 30 May, 6 June, 13 June, 29 August and 5 September 1772.

     Credits and Acknowledgements

    THIS APP WAS MADE FOR THE REGIONAL HISTORY CENTRE, THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST OF ENGLAND, BY SATSYMPH

    With thanks to the Regional History Centre and the University of the West of England, and the Bristol Festival of Ideas.

    Steve Poole - Professor of History and Heritage, Director, Regional History Centre, UWE

    Ralph Hoyte - Concept, Script & Project Management, SATSYMPH

    Michael Fairfax - Music & FX

    Phill Phelps - Sound design, sound recording & app, SATSYMPH

    Alan Coveney - voice

    Ralph Hoyte - voice

     

    Particular thanks to Andy Doran (whistle), his son Jon Doran (fiddle), and Gwilym Davis (melodeon) of the Campden Morrismen for recording a piece for me to use. Much appreciated!

    Additional sound effects from freesound.org:

    Footsteps, Concrete, A.wav by InspectorJ

    Moray coast.wav by inchadney

    Terreiro do Paço plaza docks' pontoons "symphony" by alfdroid

    Dock,Wood,Creak,Water,Laping.wav by Filipe Chagas

    Creaky dock - Underwater Hydrophone Recording by weaveofk

    Ferry pontoon pier squeaking in light waves, rubber on metal by Pfannkuchn

  3. 1 To The Dark Tower Came
  4. 2 Fairy Flax
  5. 3 At The Fish Inn Door
  6. 4 Back to Back
  7. 5 In Full View of His Crime
  8. 6 Sentences
  9. 7 Lux Aeturnum
  1. Sommario Auditour

    PLEASE WATCH WHERE YOU'RE GOING and be especially mindful of traffic, obstacles etc! Wherever possible, just stick your mobile device in your pocket or hold it in your hand -  when it vibrates you have 7 secs to put your headphones back on to listen

     TOPS DOWN (THE CHIPPING CAMPDEN MORRISMEN MURDER)

    In May 1772, at 2pm, a market gardener named Richard Dyer was found murdered close to his house, half a mile or so from Chipping Camden. ‘There was a shocking fracture to the back of his head’ from a wooden stake found nearby and his head stretching from his mouth to his ear had been ripped open. A short time before Dyer’s body was discovered, a young girl who  passed a local called William Kelly(or 'Keely') on the road had noticed blood stains on his breeches. Kelly was arrested. He first denied the crime, implicating others, but eventually confessed.

    It was an opportunistic, spur of the moment, unpremeditated assault and robbery for money. Kelly knew Dyer and knew that he was on his way home after having been paid for a job. He ‘overtook Dyer on the road, walked with him some way, and as they passed along, he picked up a stake as it lay in the road and…’

    Kelly ‘was a well-known morris dancer’ and a few mornings earlier – on a Sunday to boot – he had been teaching some new dances to the local side along with his friend, Warner, who played pipe and tabor. The local newspapers took a strong line, saying, ‘It is to be hoped that Justices will suppress such nuisances of idleness and drunkenness as morris dances have generally proved’.

    On Friday, 28 September, 1772, Kelly was taken out of his cell in Gloucester and put into a cart for the 30 mile procession to the top of Campden Hill. They arrived at about 3pm, and found ‘many thousands’ waiting for the show to begin. Kelly now openly confessed his guilt, tried to make his peace with God, exhorted everyone there to pray for him and to take warning by his demise – it was all caused by his ‘neglect of the sabbath’, he said, and he ‘wished it had been otherwise’.

    The executioner then put a little straw in his hand, and one of the officials told him to drop the straw when he was ready. Keeley asked the official if he thought God Almighty was ready for him. Soon after, he gave the signal.

     After he was dead, Keeley’s body was hung in chains on a thirty-foot high gibbet, to act as a dreadful reminder of the awful penalty for committing murder and, perhaps, to warn the locals of the perils of taking up Morris dancing.

    Source: Oxford Journal, 30 May, 6 June, 13 June, 29 August and 5 September 1772.

     Credits and Acknowledgements

    THIS APP WAS MADE FOR THE REGIONAL HISTORY CENTRE, THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WEST OF ENGLAND, BY SATSYMPH

    With thanks to the Regional History Centre and the University of the West of England, and the Bristol Festival of Ideas.

    Steve Poole - Professor of History and Heritage, Director, Regional History Centre, UWE

    Ralph Hoyte - Concept, Script & Project Management, SATSYMPH

    Michael Fairfax - Music & FX

    Phill Phelps - Sound design, sound recording & app, SATSYMPH

    Alan Coveney - voice

    Ralph Hoyte - voice

     

    Particular thanks to Andy Doran (whistle), his son Jon Doran (fiddle), and Gwilym Davis (melodeon) of the Campden Morrismen for recording a piece for me to use. Much appreciated!

    Additional sound effects from freesound.org:

    Footsteps, Concrete, A.wav by InspectorJ

    Moray coast.wav by inchadney

    Terreiro do Paço plaza docks' pontoons "symphony" by alfdroid

    Dock,Wood,Creak,Water,Laping.wav by Filipe Chagas

    Creaky dock - Underwater Hydrophone Recording by weaveofk

    Ferry pontoon pier squeaking in light waves, rubber on metal by Pfannkuchn

Recensioni

Non esistono ancora recensioni

Scrivi una recensione per primo
A minimum rating of 1 star is required.
Please fill in your name.

Sponsor di questo tour